Meeting and Confeences



21st International AIDS Conference
AIDS 2016
18-22 July 2016 DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA


Registration for the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) official pre-conference meetings is now open! This year, AIDS 2016 is taking a new approach to the traditional pre-conferences, offering a more formal programme to enhance the delegate experience.

For the first time, a selected group of independently organized pre-conference meetings will be held within the main conference venue over the weekend of 16 and 17 July, immediately preceding AIDS 2016. This year’s official pre-conferences represent a diversity of scientific, technical, and community interests and we are delighted to announce the official AIDS 2016 pre-conference programme line-up and provide you with a step-by-step guide on how to register.

THE PRE-CONFERENCE PROGRAMME
Please find the pre-conference programme below. For more information about each meeting, visit the AIDS 2016 pre-conference page here.

Open pre-conference meetings
The open pre-conference meetings are open to conference delegates on a first-come, first-served basis.

Action + Access: Rights and Demands of Gay and Bisexual Men in the Global HIV Response organized by Men Who Have Sex With Men Global Forum (MSMGF) Saturday 16 July

In Our Voice: Positive Stories! Positive Teens! Positive Lives! organized by Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) Sunday 17 July

The 3rd International HIV/Viral Hepatitis Co-Infection Meeting organized by the International AIDS Society (IAS) Sunday 17 July

No More Lip Service: Trans Access, Equity and Rights, Now! organized by the International Reference Group on Transgender Women and HIV/AIDS (IRGT) Sunday 17 July

TB2016 organized by the International AIDS Society (IAS) Saturday, 16 and Sunday, 17 July

Application required pre-conference meetings
The application required meetings indicate that the pre-conference organizers have sole discretion to add you as an attendee following your registration submission.

Nursing HIV 2016 organized by the Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa (DENOSA), the International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs (ICAP), the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (ANAC) and the International Council of Nurses (ICN)
Saturday 16 July

UN 90-90-90 Target Workshop: A Vehicle for Knowledge Translation of Treatment and Prevention organized by the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE)
Sunday 17 July

Towards an HIV Cure Symposium organized by the International AIDS Society (IAS)
Saturday, 16 and Sunday, 17 July

LIVING 2016: The Positive Leadership Summit organized by the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+)
Saturday, 16 and Sunday, 17 July

HOW TO REGISTER

Registration to attend the pre-conferences is done through the official AIDS 2016 registration system. Please be sure to register early to secure your seat. For individuals not attending the full conference, a pre-conference pass is available for purchase, which will allow access to the full conference venue and a maximum of three pre-conferences. Delegates with a full registration or a pre-conference registration will be able to register for up to three pre-conference meetings. Below is a step-by-step guide to register:

Step 1: Before you can register, you need to create a conference profile here. If you already have a conference profile from previous International AIDS Society (IAS) or International AIDS conferences, you will be able to use the same login credentials here.

Step 2: Submit your registration and payment in full for either the full AIDS 2016 conference or the pre-conference pass.

Step 3: Check that your registration status is confirmed by looking in the upper right hand corner in the Registration section on your profile home page. It should read "You have registered".

Step 4: If your registration status is confirmed, scroll down your profile home page to the pre-conferences selection tab and click to "Read Details". If your registration is still not confirmed, contact preconferences@AIDS2016.org for support.

Step 5: At this stage, you are not registered for any pre-conferences. In the pre-conferences tab, move over to "Click here to update your pre-conferences registrations." Click the link to access the list of pre-conferences and read the descriptions, check their dates, and select up to a maximum of three pre-conferences.

PLEASE NOTE: For meetings that require an application to register, the pre-conference organizers have sole discretion to add you as an attendee. A pop-up application will direct you to email the organizer or fill out an application form and the pre-conference organizer will contact you directly.

Step 6: Once you have selected the pre-conference meetings of your choice, check the box that you agree to the Terms & Conditions and click “Submit”. The next page will confirm that you were added to the selected pre-conferences. Proceed back to your profile home page to view your pre-conference selections listed in the pre-conferences tab.

Still have questions? Not to worry, we are hosting an AIDS 2016 pre-conference webinar on Tuesday, 1 March 2016, 14:00 CET to provide further details and answer all of your remaining questions. Please join the webinar here.

Be sure to visit www.AIDS2016.org over the coming months for additional pre-conference programme and scheduling details. For any questions regarding pre-conference registration please contact us at preconferences@AIDS2016.org.

We look forward to seeing you in Durban!

Sincerely,
AIDS 2016 conference organizers
www.AIDS2016.org





War, Migration, and Health – Symposium Istanbul 26-27 February 2016 - Save the date! The World Medical Association together with the Turkish Medical Association and the Istanbul Chamber of Medicine will hold a Symposium on War, Migration and Health. The Symposium follows an emergency resolution adopted by the WMA General Assembly in October 2015 on the critical issue of refugees and migrants, and the resultant healthcare crisis.

WMA Resolution on Global Refugee Crisis
WMA





IAS 2013 Update
(Edition 1 – November 2012)

This electronic update provides information about the 7th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) which will be held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 30 June to 3 July 2013.
In this edition:

- Call for Abstracts
- Registration
- Satellite Sessions
- Exhibition Space
- Invitation Programme
- Local Partner
- Key Dates

1. CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
The 7th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention welcomes the submission of abstracts for original contribution to the field in the following four programme tracks:
- Track A: Basic Sciences
- Track B: Clinical Sciences
- Track C: Prevention Science
- Track D: Operations and Implementation Research
For more information on Track Scope and Objectives please visit: www.ias2013.org/track_scope.aspx.

All abstracts submitted to the conference will go through a blind, peer-reviewed process carried out by an international review panel. Each abstract will be reviewed by no fewer than three reviewers, and the final selection of abstracts will be made by members of the Scientific Programme and Track Committees in March 2013.

Successful abstracts will be selected for presentation in Oral Abstract Sessions, Oral Poster Discussion Sessions or at the Poster Exhibition.

Abstract submissions open on 1 December 2012 and close on 24 January 2013.

For more information on abstract submission please visit: www.ias2013.org/abstracts.aspx.

2. REGISTRATION
All registrations (regular delegate, student/post-doc/youth delegate, media representative) for the 7th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention must be submitted using the online registration form. As part of the registration process, you will be asked to create a personal profile, which will become your online gateway to all conference-related submissions. Once you enter your contact information in the profile, you will not need to do so again. Delegates of previous IAS or International AIDS Conferences can use previous profile log in information to access their profile.

Please note that the registration fees published online do not include VAT.
Registration will open on 1 December 2012. Delegates are encouraged to register by 14 February 2013, 24:00 CET to avoid a late surcharge.

3. SATELLITE SESSIONS
Industry-sponsored satellite meetings will take place all day on Sunday, 30 June and in the mornings and evenings on the remaining days, Monday to Wednesday, 1-3 July. These meetings are entirely organized by the Major Industry Sponsors of the conference. There will also be a limited number of satellite meetings sponsored by non-commercial organizations during these same hours. The contents and speakers of the satellite sessions will be reviewed by the Programme Committee to ensure that they meet the scientific and ethical principles of the conference.
For more information on Satellite Sessions please visit: www.ias2013.org/Default.aspx?pageId=513 or contact the Satellite Sessions Department at satellites@ias2013.org.
Applications for Satellite Sessions will open on 1 December 2012.

4. EXHIBITION SPACE
The exhibition space at the conference will be open from Sunday, 30 June to Wednesday, 3 July. An area of over 3,000 square meters gives both commercial and non-commercial organizations a unique opportunity to showcase their products, programmes and services to a targeted audience.
For more information on Exhibition please visit:www.ias2013.org/Default.aspx?pageId=513 or contact the Exhibition Department at exhibitions@ias2013.org.
Applications for exhibition space will open on 1 December 2012.

5. INVITATION PROGRAMME
The IAS 2013 Invitation Programme is now available online. Please click here to download a copy.
For additional information, please contact the secretariat at info@ias2013.org.

6. LOCAL PARTNER
IAS 2013 will be organized by the International AIDS Society (IAS), in partnership with the Centre of Excellence for Research in AIDS (CERiA), University of Malaya. The centre was established in 2007 to undertake HIV-related research with a particular focus on HIV and substance use and related co-morbidities including tuberculosis (TB) and hepatitis C.

7. KEY DATES
We remind you of the following important deadlines:

1 December 2012
- Registrations open
- Abstract submissions open
- Exhibition applications open
- Satellite applications open
- Accommodation bookings open
- Tour bookings open

6 December 2012
- Scholarship applications open

24 January 2013
- Abstract submissions close
- Scholarship applications close

1 February 2013
- Affiliated Independent Events submissions open

14 February 2013 – 24:00 CET
- Registration standard fee deadline

18 March 2013
- Satellite applications close

1 April 2013
- Volunteer applications open

3 April 2013
- Late breaker submissions open

18 April 2013 – 24:00 CET
- Registration late fee deadline

7 May 2013
- Late breaker submissions close

10 May
- Exhibition applications close

30 June - 3 July 2013
- Conference

Sincerely,
IAS 2013 Conference Secretariat
7th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia,
30 June - 3 July 2013

For more information, visit: www.ias2013.org




AIDS 2012 Ignites Momentum for the Beginning of the End of the AIDS Epidemic
Scientific, Political and Community Leaders Call for Collaborative Partnerships and Investments in Research, Treatment and Prevention to Turn the Tide on HIV


Friday, 27 July 2012 (Washington, D.C., United States) ---The global AIDS community concluded its biennial meeting today with a clear sense that the end of the AIDS epidemic is possible with sustained financial, political and scientific commitment. As delegates and organizers depart Washington, D.C., where the conference opened 22 July under the theme Turning the Tide Together, they understand that though a vaccine or cure is still necessary, scaling up resources and the tools available today has the potential to save millions of lives. Only with coordinated efforts to expand HIV prevention and treatment initiatives, integrate HIV programs into broader health services, maintain funding, and improve human rights across vulnerable populations will the international community begin to end the AIDS epidemic.

“AIDS 2012 has brought delegates together from around the world to Washington, D.C. – with one aim in mind – to turn the tide on the HIV epidemic. We have seen breaking science, exciting strategizing for a cure, sessions for the young and old affected by HIV, to name just a few. The success of the Global Village and the Youth Programme has galvanized the efforts of the activists and young scientists who will be the future of our fight to end AIDS,” said Dr. Elly Katabira, AIDS 2012 International Chair, President of the International AIDS Society (IAS) and Professor of Medicine at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. "As International Chair, I would like to commend everyone for their tireless efforts to make AIDS 2012 a truly great conference, and I urge delegates to maintain the momentum.”

AIDS 2012 drew nearly 24,000 participants from 183 countries. The week-long programme featured 194 sessions covering science, community and leadership. The conference was supported by almost 1,000 volunteers from all over the United States and other countries.

“AIDS 2012 represented many milestones in the history of the International AIDS Conference, but most importantly, it is the first time we have been united around the one goal to end AIDS,” said Dr. Diane Havlir, AIDS 2012 U.S. Co-Chair and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. “Serious dialogue is now happening about collaboration among the diverse communities involved in this effort – science, advocacy, faith, and vulnerable populations. In the face of all of this optimism, I am humbled by the job ahead of us, but this meeting has inspired me. I know we will keep moving toward our shared goal of ending AIDS.”

Thousands of delegates signed the Washington, D.C. Declaration, the official declaration of the XIX International AIDS Conference. The declaration states that we must strive for multi-disciplinary approaches that respect and uphold the human rights and dignity of all people affected by the epidemic and calls for nine concrete actions. Sign the declaration online at www.dcdeclaration.org or www.2endaids.org

At the Closing Session, U.S. House of Representatives Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi said, “The International AIDS Conference is focused on solutions, care, and a cure, bringing together experts, policy makers, and people living with HIV around a single goal: ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic once and for all. HIV/AIDS is a challenge that knows no borders, and the United States must continue to invest in treatments and prevention at home, while working to restore a future of hope and health to communities around the world.” The session also featured a keynote address by President William J. Clinton.

Incoming IAS President and AIDS 2014 International Conference Chair Prof. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi gave an inaugural address. Barré-Sinoussi, a Nobel Laureate, is Director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Unit at the Institute Pasteur in Paris.

At the conclusion of the Closing Session, Katabira, Havlir and Barré-Sinoussi officially transferred the International AIDS Conference globe from Washington, D.C., to Melbourne, Australia, which will host the XX International AIDS Conference in July 2014. Accepting the globe for Melbourne were AIDS 2014 Australia Chair Sharon Lewin, Professor of Medicine at Monash University, and representatives of the AIDS 2014 local partners.

Victoria's Health Minister, David Davis, said the Australian health policy response to HIV involves a high degree of partnership between government, scientists and civil society sharing a commitment to care and support of people living with HIV/AIDS and ending the HIV epidemic. “As the hosts of AIDS 2014, Australia will lead collaborative, global dialogue on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS, sharing the benefits of such partnerships with other countries.”


Friday Plenary Session
HIV in the Larger Global Health Context


Speakers:

Anthony Harries, Senior Advisor, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, France, TB and HIV: Science and Implementation to Turn the Tide on TB

The unacceptably high burden of death due to HIV-associated tuberculosis can be significantly reduced by early use of antiretroviral therapy, isoniazid preventive therapy, use of new TB diagnostic tools and co-location and integration of HIV and TB services.“Through the application of new science and the strategic use of new diagnostic tools, we can greatly reduce the burden of disease and premature death from HIV-associated tuberculosis.”

Judith Currier, Professor, University of California, Los Angeles, United States, Intersection of Non-Communicable Diseases and Ageing in HIV

The life expectancy of people with treated HIV infection has improved significantly with the availability of potent antiretroviral therapy, but in many cases not to normal levels due in part due to the development of non-communicable diseases (NCD) such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Currier will highlight the interactions and challenges the twin epidemics of HIV and NCD present for clinical management and the delivery of care. “We need to understand the factors that contribute to the development of NCD in people ageing with treated HIV infection so that we can develop interventions to prevent the morbidity of these conditions in the years ahead.”

Yogan Pillay, Deputy Director General, Strategic Health Programmes,National Department of Health, South Africa, Optimization, Effectiveness and Efficiency of Service Delivery: Integration of HIV and Health Services

Some countries’ HIV programmes have probably reached optimal efficiencies with respect to the supply side (human resource costs, drug costs and laboratory costs for example). The need to also focus on optimal patient outcomes is equally important. While many countries in sub-Saharan Africa have made significant strides to deal with the HIV epidemic, any reduction in effort and resources will negatively impact on the gains made

ENDS


AIDS 2012 Live webcast: www.kff.org/aids2012

Conference Organization
AIDS 2012 is convened by the International AIDS Society and the conference’s international partners: the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+); the International Council of AIDS Service Organizations (ICASO); the International Community of Women with HIV/AIDS (ICW) and the United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS): the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC); Sidaction.
The U.S.-based Black AIDS Institute; the District of Columbia Department of Health (DOH); the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA); the National Institutes of Health (NIH); the Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP) at the White House; and the U.S. Positive Women’s Network (USPWN) are serving as local partners.
AIDS 2012: Join the conversation
Get the latest conference updates and share your thoughts and ideas through the Conference Facebook and Twitter. We are tweeting – @aids2012 – and hope many of you will tweet along with us, using #AIDS2012 to keep the conversation going. Become a fan of AIDS 2012 on Facebook and stay in touch with the latest conference updates and developments. Please visit www.facebook.com/aids2012 to become a fan. If your group or organization is participating in AIDS 2012, we welcome posts of photos and videos of your work on this page. Tell us why you are coming to Washington and what you hope to gain from AIDS 2012.

About the IAS
The International AIDS Society (IAS) is the world's leading independent association of HIV professionals, with over 16,000 members from more than 196 countries working at all levels of the global response to AIDS. Our members include researchers from all disciplines, clinicians, public health and community practitioners on the frontlines of the epidemic, as well as policy and programme planners. The IAS is the custodian of the biennial International AIDS Conference and lead organizer of the IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, which will be held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from 30 June– 3 July 2013.
www.iasociety.org | www.ias2013.org

Further information:
Onsite Media centre: +1 202 249 4032

Francesca Da Ros
AIDS 2012 Communications and Media Officer
Email: Francesca.Daros@iasociety.org
Mob: +1 (202) 997 6917

Michael Kessler
AIDS 2012 International Media Coordinator
Email: michael.kessler@aids2012.org
Mob: +1 (202) 430 2160
Skype: mickgpi

Shawn Jain (Washington, D.C.)
U.S Media Relations
Mobile: +1 (202) 714-0535
shawn.jain@aids2012.org




Embargoed until Thursday July 19, 11.30 EST/17.30 CET
Inaugural Global Scientific Strategy Towards an HIV Cure launched ahead of the XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington D.C.
World´s leading HIV/AIDS Scientists and Stakeholders to gather in Washington D.C. to discuss Global Alliance on HIV Cure research.


Thursday, 19 July, 2012 (Washington D.C, US)--The Inaugural Global Scientific Strategy Towards an HIV Cure: A was launched today ahead of the XIX International AIDS Conference amid renewed optimism from the world´s leading HIV/AIDS scientists that the future prospects for finding an HIV cure are increasing.

Over the past two years the International AIDS Society (IAS) has convened a group of international experts to develop a roadmap for research towards an HIV cure. Published online in an abridged form tomorrow, Friday July 20, in Nature Reviews Immunology, Towards an HIV Cure identifies seven important priority areas for basic, translational and clinical research and maps out a path for future research collaboration and funding opportunities.(1)

“The strategy is the result of a collaborative effort which has produced a roadmap that will constructively move HIV Cure research forward,” said Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, the co-discoverer of HIV, Director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Unit at the Institut Pasteur in Paris and the IAS President-Elect. Barré-Sinoussi, together with Professor Steven Deeks, Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, is co-chair of the group of 34 leading HIV scientists and clinicians who have developed the Global Scientific Strategy. Professor Barré-Sinoussi and Professor Deeks state the case for HIV cure research in a commentary piece published today in Nature. (2)

“The science has been telling us for some time now that achieving a cure for HIV infection could be a realistic possibility. The time is right to take the opportunity to try and develop an HIV cure – we might regret never having tried”, concluded Barré-Sinoussi at the D.C. launch.

The vision for the IAS strategy for an HIV cure is very clear: a safe, affordable and scalable cure will improve the health and quality-of-life for those with established infection, reduce the risk of transmission of virus to those not infected, and ultimately allow resources to be shifted to other needs.

"Finding a cure for AIDS is a critical innovation gap," said Michel Sidibé, Executive Director of UNAIDS at the launch in D.C. "A cure will bring new hope to people living with HIV and their loved ones and could end the cycle of stigma and discrimination."

Major investments in science have resulted in the worldwide availability of over 20 anti-HIV drugs. When used in combination, these drugs restore health, prolong life and reduce transmission of the virus. HIV-infected individuals who harbour drug-susceptible virus, who have access to antiretroviral drugs, who can tolerate the drug side effects, toxicities, and other complications, and who are able to adhere to therapy can maintain control of HIV infection indefinitely.

Despite these successes, these therapies have limitations. They do not eradicate HIV, requiring people to remain on expensive and potentially toxic drugs for life. They do not fully restore health as patients still experience co-morbidities such as increased cardiovascular disease, bone disorders or cognitive impairment. They are expensive and difficult to deliver to all in need.

Although the cost of delivering antiretroviral drugs to the more than 34 million people now living with HIV has decreased substantially, and the availability of these drugs in resource-poor settings has steadily increased, the costs associated with delivering antiretroviral drugs is overwhelming many organizations and public health systems. Estimates put the cost of the funding response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic by 2015 between US$22-24 billion per year (3) and between US$19-35 billion per year by 2031, with antiretroviral treatment accounting for up to 70 per cent of the total cost of care in the most affected countries. (4)

It is estimated that for every person starting treatment, two are newly infected, a path that is clearly unsustainable.

Given these limitations, there is growing recognition that the search for an HIV Cure is an imperative both in terms of the individual and public health benefits it would provide and also an opportunity to potentially avoid the long-term cumulative costs of ART. (5)

Also, an effective and scalable HIV cure will likely achieve what preventative approaches aim to do, which is to essentially stop transmission of HIV to those who are uninfected and restore the immunological function and normal health to those who are infected (6).

The renewed optimism in the search for an HIV Cure amongst scientists is based on a number of scientific advances that are helping to shed light on why it is that HIV remains persistent.

Scientists have known for some time now that latent HIV reservoirs, where HIV hides and persists, are one of the main barriers to finding a cure. This is precisely why treatment does not eradicate HIV and why, when treatment is stopped, the virus rebounds.

“What we haven’t had until very recently is clear insights into why HIV persists during therapy,” said Steven Deeks, at the launch in Washington, D.C. “Our basic understanding of the mechanisms of HIV persistence in latent reservoirs is far superior than it was a decade ago. We are entering a stage in the epidemic in which we can seriously begin testing drugs that either prevent latency or which force the virus out of its hiding place, make it susceptible to our current drugs.” (7)

Why is an HIV Cure feasible?

Several recent observations make scientists enthusiastic about pursuing cure research.

For the first time ever there is now a “proof of concept,” as scientists like to call it, for an effective cure. The case of Timothy Brown, the so-called “Berlin Patient”, who received a stem-cell bone-marrow transplant in 2007 and is now considered to be cured of HIV has proved that a cure is at least possible. This stem cell transplant worked because the donor was among the one percent of Northern Europeans who lack CCR5, the “doorway” through which HIV enters cells. While it is unrealistic to pursue this risky and costly therapeutic approach for most people, it has nevertheless got scientists thinking about the use of gene therapy to modify a patient’s own immune cells to make them resistant to HIV infection.(8)

The molecular biology regarding how HIV DNA becomes integrated in the chromosomes of infected people is the focus of intense research. This work has already led to a number of possible interventions, some of which are being tested in the clinic. Recently, in a test in HIV+ patients, David Margolis and colleagues showed that a dose of a drug that inhibits an enzyme involved in HIV silencing leads to rapid production of HIV RNA in the patient’s latently infected cells. This could make such previously unreachable viral reservoirs susceptible to curative strategies. For example, in combination with treatments that enhance host immune defense, unmasking latent virus might allow clearance of infection (9).

Scientists have also been aware of a rare group of HIV infected people who appear to have naturally “cured” their own infection. These “elite controllers” are HIV positive but have no readily apparent virus in the blood. Scientists are gaining a better understanding of this group of patients.

There exists a unique cohort of patients in France who became HIV infected, started therapy early, and were able to successfully stop therapy without viral rebound (the “Visconti Cohort”). The study confirms the benefits of treating HIV at the very early stages of infection. There is an immensely valuable store of knowledge to be gained from analyzing the immunological characteristics that made therapy redundant for these patients. (10)

Understanding this group of people who efficiently control the virus replication and reservoirs, scientists believe, might lead to novel therapeutic interventions.


How can HIV be cured?

Currently, the following strategies are being investigated and it is expected that all of these strategies will be more efficient in combination with each other, alongside the use of antiretroviral therapy to at least protect the immune system of patients to prepare them for a cure:

- Gene therapy
- Treatment Optimization and Intensification (eliminate all replication)
- Reversal of HIV latency (increase virus production)
- Immune-based Therapies (reverse pro-latency signaling)
- Therapeutic Vaccination (to enhance host-control)

About TAG

The Treatment Action Group (TAG) is an independent AIDS research and policy think tank fighting for better treatment, a vaccine, and a cure for AIDS. TAG works to ensure that all people with HIV receive lifesaving treatment, care,

and information. www.treatmentactiongroup.org




International AIDS Society and amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research,to Honor Pioneering Iranian Doctors Arash Alaei and Kamiar Alaei with Inaugural Elizabeth Taylor Award

Brothers to Receive Award from Actress Sharon Stone at Opening Session of XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012)

20 July 2012 (Washington, DC) –Dr. Arash Alaei and Dr. Kamiar Alaei sat in prison during the last International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) as supporters held signs urging their release. On Sunday, 22 July, the brothers will stand before the assembled AIDS 2012 delegates to accept the inaugural Elizabeth Taylor Award in Recognition of Efforts to Advocate for Human Rights in the field of HIV to honor their efforts to put issues of drug use and HIV on Iran’s national health care agenda and their engagement in human rights issues after their release from prison.

The Elizabeth Taylor Award is presented by amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research and the International AIDS Society (IAS) in honor of amfAR’s Founding International Chairman Dame Elizabeth Taylor, a highly visible, vocal and relentless champion of the human rights of all people living with or affected by HIV. Sharon Stone, amfAR’s Global Fundraising Chairman, will present the award during the cultural programme of the AIDS 2012 Opening Session on Sunday, 22 July, at 18:00 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.

“I'm immensely proud that my grandmother's advocacy on behalf of all people affected by HIV/AIDS is being given a lasting tribute by having this worthy award named in her honor. I'm doubly proud that the award's first recipients, Drs. Kamiar and Arash Alaei, so admirably personify the courage and compassion that my grandmother challenged people to find in themselves when confronting this disease,” said Taylor’s grandson, Quinn Tivey.

Kamiar Alaei was released from prison in the fall of 2010 and attended the 6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in July 2011 to speak out for this brother’s release. Arash Alaei was released in August 2011.

“In advocating for the health and human rights of Iranians living with and at risk for HIV, the Alaei brothers demonstrated tremendous courage and fortitude,” said Kenneth Cole, Chairman of the Board of amfAR. “Their example should inspire all of us to rededicate ourselves to advocate for human rights and against stigma and discrimination as a core component of the AIDS effort, just as Elizabeth Taylor did in the very early days of HIV.”

“Many of us attending AIDS 2012 followed the Alaei brothers’ struggle and campaigned for their release, so it is a great honor and pleasure to welcome them back to the International AIDS Conference as delegates and colleagues,” said Elly Katabira, President of the IAS. “As an association of health professionals working in HIV, the IAS is especially proud to recognize our peers for their unwavering commitment to the human rights and dignity of those they serve.”

The brothers were actively involved in AIDS research in Iran and, along with other clinicians and advocates, helped make the country a leader in prevention of HIV and treatment for people living with HIV, including enlightened policies on needle exchange and one of the region’s best prison programmes. The doctors shared their knowledge by holding training workshops for Afghan and Tajik health professionals.

At the time of their arrest, Kamiar was studying for his doctorate in public health at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany School of Public Health, and both doctors were working with organizations in New York to share ideas on HIV and harm reduction best practices. Iranian authorities detained them in June 2008 without cause and without charges or a trial. After a one-day, closed-door trial, they were convicted on January 19, 2009 and sentenced under charges of being in “communications with an enemy government” and “seeking to overthrow the Iranian government under article 508 of Iran’s Islamic Penal Code”. Kamiar was sentenced to three years in prison and Arash was sentenced to six years. Both were freed early following highly visibly international efforts.

End

About amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research:

amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, is one of the world’s leading nonprofit organizations dedicated to the support of AIDS research, HIV prevention, treatment education, and the advocacy of sound AIDS-related public policy. Since 1985, amfAR has invested more than $340 million in its programs and has awarded grants to more than 2,000 research teams worldwide.

About the IAS:

The International AIDS Society (IAS) is the world's leading independent association of HIV professionals, with over 16,000 members from more than 196 countries working at all levels of the global response to AIDS. Our members include researchers from all disciplines, clinicians, public health and community practitioners on the frontlines of the epidemic, as well as policy and programme planners. The IAS is the custodian of the biennial International AIDS Conference, which will be held in Washington, D.C., in July 2012, and lead organizer of the IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention.

About Elizabeth Taylor:
In 1985, Elizabeth Taylor joined with Dr. Mathilde Krim and a small group of physicians and scientists to form the American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR). As amfAR’s International Founding Chair, she used her celebrity to take the issue of HIV/AIDS to the mainstream media. In October 1991, Taylor established The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF). With a focus on direct services for people living with HIV/AIDS, ETAF provides funding to AIDS service organizations throughout the world to assist those living with HIV/AIDS. During her lifetime, Elizabeth Taylor’s advocacy efforts served to raise much-needed funds and awareness of the AIDS pandemic. Her legacy of humanitarian service and commitment to fighting HIV/AIDS continues through the work of The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation. www.ElizabethTaylorAIDSFoundation.org.

For more information:

Sian Bowen (Geneva, Switzerland)
Senior Manager, Communications
Email: Sian.Bowen@iasociety.org
Tel: +41 22 710 0864 US Mob (July 16-28): +1 202 997 6935

Francesca Da Ros (Geneva, Switzerland)
Communications and Media Officer
Email: Francesca.Daros@iasociety.org
Tel: +41 22 710 0822
Mob: +41 796 109679 US Mob (July 16-28): +1 202 997 6917

Annalee Paulo (Los Angeles, USA)
The Elizabeth Taylor Trust
Email: Annalee.Paulo@42West.net
Tel: +1 310 477 4442




International AIDS Conference Opens in the U.S. for the First Time in 22 Years at Defining Moment in the History of the AIDS Epidemic‏

Sunday, 22 July 2012 (Washington, D.C., USA) Under the theme Turning the Tide Together, more than 21,000 delegates from more than 195 countries gathered in Washington, D.C. for the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) to begin the march toward the end of the AIDS epidemic. Noting that recent scientific advances have changed the landscape of the epidemic, delegates will dedicate the week to presenting the latest scientific research and building momentum toward ensuring that financing and global leadership across all sectors keep pace with scientific progress against HIV. The conference runs through Friday, 27 July at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.


“Our return to the United States after a 22-year absence comes at a time of extraordinary hope, a time when we believe that the end of the AIDS epidemic is possible, said Elly Katabira International Chair of AIDS 2012 and President of the International AIDS Society (IAS). “AIDS 2012 is an important opportunity to thank the American people and highlight the millions of lives saved as a result of generous U.S. contributions to the global fight against AIDS and its leadership in HIV research.”

“There is no doubt, that our progress over the past 30 years has been impressive, but maintaining the status quo is simply not enough,” said Dr. Diane Havlir, U.S. Co-Chair of AIDS 2012 and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. “My message to policy makers around the entire world watching us here in D.C. is this – invest in science, invest in the epidemic – you will save lives.

Drs. Katabira and Havlir called on delegates and allies around the world to sign The Washington, D.C. Declaration, the official declaration of AIDS 2012. The declaration calls for renewed urgency and seeks to build broad support for beginning to end the AIDS epidemic through a nine-point action plan. (www.dcdeclaration or www.2endaids.org).

The Opening Session included remarks from a range of U.S. and global leaders, including U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, South African Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (via video), U.S. Congresswoman Barbara Lee, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibé, Washington, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray, Ambassador Mark Dybul and Annah Sango of Zimbabwe.

“In the 22 years since this conference was held on American soil, we have made long-awaited breakthroughs in science and treatment,” said Secretary Sebelius. “Today, someone diagnosed with HIV and treated before the disease is far advanced can have a nearly normal life expectancy. Now is not the time for easing up, slowing down, or shifting our focus. If we are going to reach our ultimate goal of an AIDS-free generation, we must all challenge ourselves to do more – to reach even more people, to make programs even more effective and accountable, to push the boundaries of science even further.”

"Sustained progress in the AIDS response is accelerating our journey to Zero," said Michel Sidibé. "It is now time for a new AIDS agenda and new partnerships based on shared responsibility, mutual accountability and global solidarity."

Congresswoman Lee noted that “the return of the International AIDS Conference to the United States at this pivotal time is a long overdue opportunity for our domestic epidemic to become part of a global effort working to achieve a world without AIDS. From California to Cameroon, we are literally at a tipping point in the fight against AIDS- and at no time in history has our global leadership been more important to address the ongoing challenges in our own country and around the world.”

”Young people need to move from being passengers to drivers, Sexual reproductive health rights are fundamental to everyone the sooner we appreciate that the closer we get to making a difference in the lives of women and young people,” said Annah Sango.

The International AIDS Conference was last held in the U.S. in 1990 in San Francisco. U.S restrictions on the entry of people living with HIV prohibited the conference’s return in the ensuing 20 years. Following years of advocacy and under a process initiated by President George W. Bush and finished by President Barack Obama, the U.S. restrictions were lifted in 2010, paving the way for the conference’s return.

Conference Programme
AIDS 2012 will include the presentation of more than 3,600 scientific abstracts across the range of HIV-related disciplines along with non-abstract-driven sessions addressing key issues and the vibrant Global Village and Youth Programme. All accepted abstracts are available through the conference website.

Online Viewing
A substantial portion of the conference will be available through webcasts produced by the Kaiser Family Foundation (www.kff.org/aids2012), as well as videos and slide presentations available through the conference’s Programme-at-Glance (http://pag.aids2012.org).

Conference Organization
AIDS 2012 is convened by the International AIDS Society and the conference’s international partners: the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+); the International Council of AIDS Service Organizations (ICASO); the International Community of Women with HIV/AIDS (ICW) and the United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS): the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC); and Sidaction.

The U.S.-based Black AIDS Institute; the District of Columbia Department of Health (DOH); the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA); the National Institutes of Health (NIH); the White House Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP); and the U.S. Positive Women’s Network (USPWN) serve as local partners.

AIDS 2012: Join the conversation
Get the latest conference updates and share your thoughts and ideas through the Conference Facebook and Twitter. We are tweeting – @aids2012 – and hope many of you will tweet along with us, using #AIDS2012 to keep the conversation going. Become a fan of AIDS 2012 on Facebook and stay in touch with the latest conference updates and developments. Please visit www.facebook.com/aids2012 to become a fan. If your group or organization is participating in AIDS 2012, we welcome posts of photos and videos of your work on this page. Tell us why you are coming to Washington and what you hope to gain from AIDS 2012.

For interview requests with Elly Katabira and more information about this release:

Francesca Da Ros
AIDS 2012 Communications and Media Officer
Email: Francesca.Daros@iasociety.org
Tel: +1 202 997 6917

Michael Kessler
AIDS 2012 International Media Coordinator
Email: michael.kessler@aids2012.org
Mob: + 1 202 430 2160
Skype: mickgpi

For interview requests with Diane Havlir and more information about this release:

Shawn Jain (Washington, D.C.)
U.S Media Relations
Email: shawn.jain@aids2012.org
Tel: +1 (202) 470-3127
Mobile: +1 (202) 714-0535

Adina Ellis (Washington, D.C.)
U.S. Communications and Public Affairs
Email: adina.ellis@aids2012.org
Tel: +1 (202) 714- 6793
----------------------------

AIDS 2012 Opening Session
The Opening Session is scheduled from 19:00-21:00 on Sunday, 22 July 2012. The Cultural programme is from 18:00-19:00.
17:30 Doors open
18:00 Films/videos
18:13 IAS/amfAR Elizabeth Taylor award, in recognition of efforts to advocate for human rights in the field of HIV, Sharon Stone, United States
18:18 Films/videos
18:25 Opening blessing, Indigenous community group
18:30 Cultural entertainment, Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, D.C.
-----
19:00 Opening convocation, Reverend Charles Straight, Pastor of the Faith United Methodist
Church, United States
19:03 AIDS 2012 co-chairs’ welcome, Elly Katabira, International Chair, and Diane Havlir, U.S. Co-Chair
19:13 Welcome to DC, Mayor Vincent C. Gray, United States
19:19 Time for accountability, Annah Sango, Zimbabwe
19:29 Ending AIDS and poverty, Jim Kim, The World Bank
19:39 Our journey to zero: a new era to leverage opportunities and share responsibility, Michel Sidibé, UNAIDS
19:49 Address by the Secretary General of the United Nations, SG Ban Ki-moon (video message)
20:00 The beginning of the end of AIDS, Barbara Lee, Congresswoman, United States
20:05 Remarks, Mark Dybul, United States
20:15 Remarks, Kgalema Motlanthe, Deputy President, South Africa 20:25 Remarks, Secretary of Health and Human Services, United StatesKathleen Sebelius,

21:00 End of Opening Session




Call at AIDS 2012 for action to remove HIV-related travel restrictions

Saturday, 21 July, 2012 (Washington, D.C.) - On Sunday, 22 July 2012, a Satellite Session organized by UNAIDS and Republic of Korea, at the AIDS 2012 conference in Washington, D.C. from 9-11am in Mini-room 7, will discuss the latest developments and challenges of HIV travel restrictions around the world.

To date, there are still 46 countries, territories and areas that apply some form of restriction on the entry, stay and residence of people living with HIV (“HIV-related travel restrictions”). In many cases, these restrictions were put in place when there was great fear and little knowledge about how HIV was transmitted and what the health implications were of being HIV positive.

Public health and human rights experts have called for the removal of such restrictions for many years, characterizing them as discriminatory and ineffective to protect public health. Now, with significant advancements in scientific knowledge about HIV and its prevention and treatment, even more reasons to remove such restrictions have become apparent.

Dr Paul de Lay, Deputy Executive Director of the UNAIDS Programme said "Every individual should have the right to freedom of movement, regardless of their HIV status. UNAIDS is opposed to any restriction imposed on people living with HIV and restricting movement only on the basis of their HIV status. These restrictions are discriminatory."

Besides being discriminatory, travel restrictions have no public health justification. Often they open the door to additional forms of abuse including violation of the human rights of people living with HIV and an increase in stigma. HIV should not be considered a condition that poses a threat to public health in relation to travel because, although it is transmissible, HIV cannot be transmitted by the mere presence of a person with HIV in a country or by casual contact.


Objectives of the Satellite Session: Key figures from governments, the medical field and civil society, including people living with HIV, will discuss and respond to the current situation regarding HIV-related travel restrictions. The Satellite Session HIV Travel Restrictions: Latest Developments will present an open discussion about HIV travel restrictions, highlighting their public health and human rights’ impact. The session will provide global, regional and national perspectives on such restrictions, focusing among others on presenting:

· An overview of the global situation
· Current efforts to remove HIV travel restrictions in the Republic of Korea
· A testimonial of someone who has experienced HIV travel restrictions
· The experience of removing HIV travel restrictions
· The impact of HIV travel restrictions in the Gulf States on migrant workers from Asia


Call for action:
In line with commitments made in the 2011 Political Declaration,theSatellite Session will call on governmentsto remove HIV-related travel restrictions and ensure that an effective and rights-based approach to HIV is in place in all countries.

IAS President Dr Elly Katabira, Professor of Medicine at Makerere University in Uganda, said "The return of the conference to the United States is the result of years of dedicated advocacy to end a misguided policy based on fear, rather than science, and represents a significant victory for public health and human rights." Dr Katabira is the International Chair of AIDS 2012.

The Obama Administration lifted HIV-related travel restrictions in 2010.


Co-chairs:
· Professor Myongsei Sohn, Dean, School of Public Health – Yonsei University, Republic of Korea
· Dr Paul De Lay, Deputy Executive Director, UNAIDS


Organiser:
· Korea Center for Disease Control and Yonsei University School of Public Health, UNAIDS


Speakers:
· Susan Timberlake, Chief, Human Rights and Law Division, UNAIDS
· Bong-hyun Kim, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Dr Dukhyoung Lee, Director General of Disease Prevention Centre, Centre for Disease Control, Republic of Korea
· George Bartolome,United Western Visayas Inc.
· Representative of US –tbc; and Representative of Ukraine - Dr Maryna Zelenska, Ministry of Health
· Malu Marin, CARAM Asia

End

Further information:
The Global Database on HIV Specific Travel & Residence Restrictions: http://www.hivtravel.org
The International Aids Conference 2012 official website: http://aids2012.org/

Conference Programme
AIDS 2012 will include the presentation of more than 3,600 scientific abstracts across the range of HIV-related disciplines along with non-abstract-driven sessions addressing key issues and the vibrant Global Village and Youth Programme. All accepted abstracts are available through the conference website.

Online Viewing
A substantial portion of the conference will be available through webcasts produced by the Kaiser Family Foundation (www.kff.org/aids2012), as well as videos and slide presentations available through the conference’s Programme-at-Glance (http://pag.aids2012.org).

Conference Organization
AIDS 2012 is convened by the International AIDS Society and the conference’s international partners: the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+); the International Council of AIDS Service Organizations (ICASO); the International Community of Women with HIV/AIDS (ICW) and the United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS): the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC); and Sidaction.

The U.S.- based Black AIDS Institute; the District of Columbia Department of Health (DOH); the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA); the National Institutes of Health (NIH); the White House Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP); and the U.S. Positive Women’s Network (USPWN) serve as local partners.

AIDS 2012: Join the conversation
Get the latest conference updates and share your thoughts and ideas through the Conference Facebook and Twitter. We are tweeting – @aids2012 – and hope many of you will tweet along with us, using #AIDS2012 to keep the conversation going. Become a fan of AIDS 2012 on Facebook and stay in touch with the latest conference updates and developments. Please visit www.facebook.com/aids2012 to become a fan. If your group or organization is participating in AIDS 2012, we welcome posts of photos and videos of your work on this page. Tell us why you are coming to Washington and what you hope to gain from AIDS 2012.


About the IAS
The International AIDS Society (IAS) is the world's leading independent association of HIV professionals, with over 16,000 members from more than 196 countries working at all levels of the global response to AIDS. Our members include researchers from all disciplines, clinicians, public health and community practitioners on the frontlines of the epidemic, as well as policy and programme planners. The IAS is the custodian of the biennial International AIDS Conference, which will be held in Washington, D.C., in July 2012, and lead organizer of the IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention.


About UNAIDS
Leveraging the AIDS response, UNAIDS works to build political action and to promote the rights all of people for better results for global health and development. Globally, it sets policy and is the source of HIV-related data. In countries, UNAIDS brings together the resources of the UNAIDS Secretariat and 10 UN system organizations for coordinated and accountable efforts to unite the world against AIDS.

For more information about this release:

Francesca Da Ros (Geneva, Switzerland)
AIDS 2012 Communications and Media Officer
Email: Francesca.Daros@iasociety.org
Tel: +41 22 710 0822
US Mob (July 16-28): +1 202 997 6917

Michael Kessler
AIDS 2012 International Media Coordinator
Email: michael.kessler@aids2012.org
Mob: +34 655 792 699
US mobile (July 14-28): +1 202 997 5851
Skype: mickgpi

Shawn Jain (Washington, D.C.)
U.S Media Relations
Tel: +1 (202) 470-3127
Mobile: +1 (202) 714-0535 shawn.jain@aids2012.org

Adina Ellis (Washington, D.C.)
U.S. Communications and Public Affairs
Email: adina.ellis@aids2012.org
Tel: +1 (202) 714 6793




International AIDS Conference Opens in the U.S. for the First Time in 22 Years at Defining Moment in the History of the AIDS Epidemic‏

Sunday, 22 July 2012 (Washington, D.C., USA) Under the theme Turning the Tide Together, more than 21,000 delegates from more than 195 countries gathered in Washington, D.C. for the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) to begin the march toward the end of the AIDS epidemic. Noting that recent scientific advances have changed the landscape of the epidemic, delegates will dedicate the week to presenting the latest scientific research and building momentum toward ensuring that financing and global leadership across all sectors keep pace with scientific progress against HIV. The conference runs through Friday, 27 July at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

“Our return to the United States after a 22-year absence comes at a time of extraordinary hope, a time when we believe that the end of the AIDS epidemic is possible, said Elly Katabira International Chair of AIDS 2012 and President of the International AIDS Society (IAS). “AIDS 2012 is an important opportunity to thank the American people and highlight the millions of lives saved as a result of generous U.S. contributions to the global fight against AIDS and its leadership in HIV research.”

“There is no doubt, that our progress over the past 30 years has been impressive, but maintaining the status quo is simply not enough,” said Dr. Diane Havlir, U.S. Co-Chair of AIDS 2012 and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. “My message to policy makers around the entire world watching us here in D.C. is this – invest in science, invest in the epidemic – you will save lives.

Drs. Katabira and Havlir called on delegates and allies around the world to sign The Washington, D.C. Declaration, the official declaration of AIDS 2012. The declaration calls for renewed urgency and seeks to build broad support for beginning to end the AIDS epidemic through a nine-point action plan. (www.dcdeclaration or www.2endaids.org).

The Opening Session included remarks from a range of U.S. and global leaders, including U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, South African Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (via video), U.S. Congresswoman Barbara Lee, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibé, Washington, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray, Ambassador Mark Dybul and Annah Sango of Zimbabwe.

“In the 22 years since this conference was held on American soil, we have made long-awaited breakthroughs in science and treatment,” said Secretary Sebelius. “Today, someone diagnosed with HIV and treated before the disease is far advanced can have a nearly normal life expectancy. Now is not the time for easing up, slowing down, or shifting our focus. If we are going to reach our ultimate goal of an AIDS-free generation, we must all challenge ourselves to do more – to reach even more people, to make programs even more effective and accountable, to push the boundaries of science even further.”

"Sustained progress in the AIDS response is accelerating our journey to Zero," said Michel Sidibé. "It is now time for a new AIDS agenda and new partnerships based on shared responsibility, mutual accountability and global solidarity."

Congresswoman Lee noted that “the return of the International AIDS Conference to the United States at this pivotal time is a long overdue opportunity for our domestic epidemic to become part of a global effort working to achieve a world without AIDS. From California to Cameroon, we are literally at a tipping point in the fight against AIDS- and at no time in history has our global leadership been more important to address the ongoing challenges in our own country and around the world.”

”Young people need to move from being passengers to drivers, Sexual reproductive health rights are fundamental to everyone the sooner we appreciate that the closer we get to making a difference in the lives of women and young people,” said Annah Sango.

The International AIDS Conference was last held in the U.S. in 1990 in San Francisco. U.S restrictions on the entry of people living with HIV prohibited the conference’s return in the ensuing 20 years. Following years of advocacy and under a process initiated by President George W. Bush and finished by President Barack Obama, the U.S. restrictions were lifted in 2010, paving the way for the conference’s return.


Conference Programme
AIDS 2012 will include the presentation of more than 3,600 scientific abstracts across the range of HIV-related disciplines along with non-abstract-driven sessions addressing key issues and the vibrant Global Village and Youth Programme. All accepted abstracts are available through the conference website.


Online Viewing
A substantial portion of the conference will be available through webcasts produced by the Kaiser Family Foundation (www.kff.org/aids2012), as well as videos and slide presentations available through the conference’s Programme-at-Glance (http://pag.aids2012.org).


Conference Organization
AIDS 2012 is convened by the International AIDS Society and the conference’s international partners: the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+); the International Council of AIDS Service Organizations (ICASO); the International Community of Women with HIV/AIDS (ICW) and the United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS): the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition (CVC); and Sidaction.
The U.S.-based Black AIDS Institute; the District of Columbia Department of Health (DOH); the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA); the National Institutes of Health (NIH); the White House Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP); and the U.S. Positive Women’s Network (USPWN) serve as local partners.


AIDS 2012: Join the conversation
Get the latest conference updates and share your thoughts and ideas through the Conference Facebook and Twitter. We are tweeting – @aids2012 – and hope many of you will tweet along with us, using #AIDS2012 to keep the conversation going. Become a fan of AIDS 2012 on Facebook and stay in touch with the latest conference updates and developments. Please visit www.facebook.com/aids2012 to become a fan. If your group or organization is participating in AIDS 2012, we welcome posts of photos and videos of your work on this page. Tell us why you are coming to Washington and what you hope to gain from AIDS 2012.

For interview requests with Elly Katabira and more information about this release:

Francesca Da Ros
AIDS 2012 Communications and Media Officer
Email: Francesca.Daros@iasociety.org
Tel: +1 202 997 6917

Michael Kessler
AIDS 2012 International Media Coordinator
Email: michael.kessler@aids2012.org
Mob: + 1 202 430 2160
Skype: mickgpi

For interview requests with Diane Havlir and more information about this release:

Shawn Jain (Washington, D.C.)
U.S Media Relations
Email: shawn.jain@aids2012.org
Tel: +1 (202) 470-3127
Mobile: +1 (202) 714-0535

Adina Ellis (Washington, D.C.)
U.S. Communications and Public Affairs
Email: adina.ellis@aids2012.org
Tel: +1 (202) 714- 6793




Morals and Medicine: a changing landscape - new BMA conference on current dilemmas in medical ethics
Wednesday 22 February 2012
BMA House, London


To launch its new edition of Medical Ethics Today the BMA is holding an innovative conference to explore challenging contemporary dilemmas in medical ethics.

Facilitated by Michael Buerk of Radio 4's The Moral Maze, the morning session will look at withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from patients in a minimally conscious state. Using a dramatised scenario based on real-life cases and supplemented by expert interventions it will ask questions including:
Should a patient be maintained in a minimally conscious state if she had previously told her relatives it would be hateful to her?
What are the financial implications of keeping people alive indefinitely in a minimally conscious state?
What sort of interests does a patient in a minimally conscious state have?

The afternoon session will include challenges to medical professionalism arising from changes both to healthcare delivery and to the way a new generation of doctors and patients choose to work and to live. It will explore questions such as:
Is a consumerist approach to health undermining the core values of medicine?
Will commercialising healthcare lead to dangerous conflicts of interest?
Younger doctors are seeking a different work-life balance - how will professionalism change?

Confirmed speakers include:
Mr Alastair Pitblado, Official Solicitor to the Senior Courts
Dr Iona Heath, President of the Royal College of General Practitioners
Professor David Haslam, President of the BMA

Registration fees include a complimentary copy of Medical Ethics Today (retail value £125) and reductions are available for BMA members.

Get full details and book your place online

If you have any questions or would like any further information about the conference,
please contact BMA Conferences on 020 7383 6137 or 6923
or email confunit@bma.org.uk




VIP code - please quote: 13822-C01-EM1-1

Save up to £300 per person - book before 16th December

Australia’s strong political, scientific and civil society commitment to ending the HIV epidemic both nationally and throughout the Asia Pacific region among reasons for selection of Melbourne as host for the XX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014)

29 November, Geneva, Switzerland. Melbourne, Australia has been chosen to host the XX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), the largest international conference on HIV and AIDS, where every two years up to 25,000 participants, representing all stakeholders in the global response to HIV, meet to assess progress and identify future priorities. AIDS 2014 will be the twentieth in the series of International AIDS Conferences.
AIDS 2014 is organized by the International AIDS Society (IAS) in partnership with selected government, scientific and civil society partners from Australia and the wider Asia Pacific region, as well as international partners from civil society and the United Nations. With a strong focus on Asia Pacific, one of the two local scientific, community and leadership partners will be chosen from the wider Asia and Pacific regions and one each from Australia.
“The IAS is extremely pleased to partner with the City of Melbourne, the State Government of Victoria, the Federal Government of Australia and with various scientific and community leaders from the host country as well as from Asia and the Pacific with a long and impressive history of leadership on HIV,” said IAS President-elect and Nobel Laureate Prof. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, Director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Unit at the Institute Pasteur in Paris and International Conference Chair for AIDS 2014.
“As the region with the largest geographic area and population, dramatically varying levels of wealth, and a complex mix of structural and behavioural determinants of risk, experts from the region have a unique perspective on the epidemic. Hosting AIDS 2014 in Melbourne will make it possible for these experts to attend the conference and share their successes and challenges on a global level,” added Prof. Barré-Sinoussi.
Prof. Sharon Lewin,Director of the Infectious Diseases Unit at the Alfred Hospital, Professor of Medicine at Monash University and co-head, Centre for Virology at the Burnet Institute in Melbourne, has been named Local Co-chair of AIDS 2014.Lewin is a former President of the Australasian Society for HIV Medicine (ASHM),the peak Australasian organization representing the medical and health sector in HIV, viral hepatitis and related areas.

“The Australian health policy response to HIV has been characterized as emerging from the grassroots rather than top-down, with a high degree of partnership between scientists, government and community. AIDS 2014 will be a great opportunity to share the benefits of such partnerships with other countries,” said Prof. Sharon Lewin.
“The Australian government also has a strong international development strategy for HIV, with particular focus on Papua New Guinea (PNG), East and South Asia and the Pacific Islands. As well as focusing international attention on Australia’s national response, the conference will highlight the diverse HIV epidemic patterns and responses in the Asia Pacific region and has the potential to positively impact the HIV responses throughout the whole region,” added Prof. Lewin.
AIDS 2014 will be held in July at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre. Melbourne has a long history in staging successful major events and conferences, is constantly adding to its infrastructure and has an established reputation as one of the world's leading business events destinations.
“We are excited about welcoming the world’s top HIV scientists and policy experts to Melbourne,” said Karen Bolinger, CEO of the Melbourne Convention + Visitors Bureau (MCVB). “This is the largest medical conference ever to be held in Australia and is a testament to the country’s deserved reputation as a leader in HIV/AIDS research. Hosting AIDS 2014 in Melbourne will not only have a positive health and social impact on the state of Victoria, but is also expected to generate approximately US$84 million for the Victorian state economy.”

According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), in 2009 an estimated 4.9 million people in Asia were living with HIV, including 360,000 who became newly infected that year. The overall trends in this region hide important variation in the epidemics, both between and within countries. Most national HIV epidemics appear to have stabilized and no country in the region has a generalized epidemic. However, in many countries in the region, the epidemic is concentrated in a relatively small number of provinces. Injecting drug users, men who have sex with men and sex workers and their clients have accounted for most of the new infections, and ongoing transmission to the female partners of drug users and the clients of sex workers is becoming apparent.

The HIV epidemic in the Pacific region is small, but the number of people living with HIV in this region nearly doubled between 2001 and 2009—from 28,000 to 57,000. However, the number of people newly infected with HIV has begun to decline from 4,700 in 2001 to 4,500 in 2009. The HIV epidemics in this region are mainly driven by sexual transmission.

In July 2012, the International AIDS Conference will be held in Washington, D.C, and the previous International AIDS Conference was held in Vienna, Austria in 2010. With more than 2,500 international journalists expected to attend the conference next year, it is the single most widely covered health event in the world.
Melbourne was selected to host AIDS 2014 following an evaluation of candidate cities by the IAS in consultation with its international partners. Candidate cities were evaluated by the IAS Governing Council according to three criteria: impact on the epidemic, sufficient infrastructure, and freedom of movement and travel for people living with HIV and AIDS. According to a policy of non-discrimination first adopted by the IAS Governing Council in 1992, the Society will not hold its conferences in countries that restrict short term entry of people living with HIV and AIDS, and/or require prospective HIV-positive visitors to declare their HIV status on visa application forms or other documentation required for entry into the country.

AIDS 2014 Organizers
Convened by
International AIDS Society (IAS)

International Partners
UNAIDS, including its co-sponsors
International Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS (ICW)
International Council of AIDS Service Organizations (ICASO)
Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+)
Sidaction

Local/Regional Partners from Australia and Asia Pacific - will be appointed in 2012

About the IAS
The International AIDS Society (IAS) is the world's leading independent association of HIV professionals, with over 16,000 members from more than 196 countries working at all levels of the global response to AIDS. Our members include researchers from all disciplines, clinicians, public health and community practitioners on the frontlines of the epidemic, as well as policy and programme planners. The IAS is the custodian of the biennial International AIDS Conference, which will be held in Washington, D.C., in July 2012, and lead organizer of the IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention.

www.iasociety.org | www.aids2012.org

For more information:
Sian Bowen (Geneva, Switzerland)
IAS Senior Manager, Communications
Email: Sian.Bowen@iasociety.org
Tel: +41 22 710 0864

Lindsey Rodger (Geneva, Switzerland)
IAS Communications and Media Officer
Email: Lindsey.Rodger@iasociety.org
Tel: +41 22 710 0822




Melbourne selected to host world’s largest conference on HIV and AIDS
Australia’s strong political, scientific and civil society commitment to ending the HIV epidemic both nationally and throughout the Asia Pacific region among reasons for selection of Melbourne as host for the XX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014)


The Commissioning Forum is delighted to announce the 2012 forum, created in collaboration and consultation with an industry-led advisory board and those at the heart of the new commissioning landscape.The Commissioning Forum will address the needs of GPs, practice managers and commissioning leads as you prepare for the challenges ahead.

Why attend the Commissioning Forum 2012?

• Gives GPs free access to all conference sessions and tailored workshops
• Engage with high level policy and thought leaders alongside GPs and PCT leads 'at the coal face' of commissioning
• Equips GPs with all the skills needed to deliver cost-effective, patient-centred care
• Focuses on finance, business, leadership, legal and clinical skills
• Limits the number of non-GPs speaking on the agenda - this is an event by commissioners, for commissioners

Save up to £300 per person - book before 16th December - call 0845 056 8299 today!

In response to the issues raised in the Commissioning Forum’s research the 2012 advisory board, as well as GPs and those at the heart of the new commissioning landscape, the agenda for 2012 will have the theme of authorisation, leadership and governance.

• How will the NHS Commissioning Board work with CCGs?
• What will the future of CCGs look like what does it mean for you?
• Understanding the role and remit of the health and well being boards
• Reducing emergency admissions
• Governance arrangements for CCGs
• Procurement of services and any willing provider
• How to get clinically-led CCGs working

New for 2012!

• Free for all GPs
• Authorisation checklist and clinic
• Special focus on clinically-led CCGs with case studies from around the UK
• CCG private lunch closed-door peer networking lunch for CCG leads – spaces limited

Speak, Participate, Partner with Commissioning Forum 2012

Some industry leaders are requesting sponsorship opportunities for this event to ring fence their current clients, develop new relationships and be seen at the forefront of this industry when best practices are required. Being involved in key thought leadership content and addressing the audience is the preferred route along with becoming an exhibitor, hosting lunches and roundtable discussions.

Don’t miss your chance to meet and network with over 200 network with those at the heart of the new commissioning. Please contact Commissioning Forum 2012 Customer Services on 0845 056 8299 or email conferences@emap.com. Further details will be available on our website www.commissioning-forum.com.

I look forward to seeing you in March.
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Event Director
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emma.emberson@emap.com

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(Edition 5 - March 2011)
This electronic update provides information about the 6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2011) which will be held in Rome, Italy from 17 to 20 July 2011.

In this edition:
Register by 5 May to Avoid Last Minute Fee Surcharge
Flights to Rome, Hotel Accommodation and Tours
Satellite Meeting and Exhibition Space Applications Remain Open
Programme-at-a-Glance
IAS 2011 Sponsorship Opportunities
Follow IAS 2011 on Facebook and Twitter


Key Dates

1. REGISTER BY 5 MAY TO AVOID LAST MINUTE FEE SURCHARGE
The standard registration fee ended on 24 February and delegates are now encouraged to register by 5 May to avoid the last minute fee surcharge, which begins on 6 May. If the completed registration form and payment in full are received on or before 5 May, a conference bag and other conference materials, including the conference programme and the abstract CD-ROM, are guaranteed. If the completed registration form and/or full payment are received after 5 May (including onsite registrations), we cannot guarantee that a conference bag and other conference materials will be available.
All registrations for IAS 2011 must be submitted through the online registration form. Before you can register, you need to create a conference profile from which you can enter the registration system. Your conference profile will then become your online gateway to all conference-related submissions. Delegates of previous International AIDS Conferences or IAS Conferences can use previous profile log-in information to access their profile.
To register for IAS 2011 please click here. For further information and registration fees please click here.

2. FLIGHTS TO ROME, HOTEL ACCOMMODATION AND TOURS
The IAS 2011 Flights Department offers attractive airfares for delegates attending the 6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention. These special fares are available for flights to Rome and back between 7 July and 30 July 2011. Savings of up to 20% are possible, depending on the route and availability. Click here for booking details.
A large number of hotel rooms in various price categories have been secured at negotiated rates for groups. Online accommodation bookings for both individual delegates and for groups can be made here.
Optional tours before, during and after the conference will be available. Please click here for more information about tours.

3. SATELLITE MEETINGS AND EXHIBITION SPACE APPLICATIONS REMAIN OPEN
Industry-sponsored satellite meetings will take place all day on Sunday, 17 July and in the mornings and evenings on the remaining days, Monday to Wednesday, 18-20 July. Satellite meetings take place in the conference centre but are fully organized and coordinated by the organization hosting the satellite. The contents and speakers of the satellite meetings will be reviewed by the programme committee to ensure that they meet the scientific and ethical principles of the conference.
A limited number of satellite meetings sponsored by non-commercial organizations will be available during the conference. Please note that there are no opportunities for commercial satellites other than those organized by Major Industry Sponsors.
Full information about Satellites at IAS 2011 is available here. Please contact satellites@ias2011.org for additional information.
IAS 2011 offers opportunities to both commercial and non-commercial organizations to showcase their products, programmes and services to a targeted audience.
Full information about exhibiting at IAS 2011 is available here. Please contact exhibitions@ias2011.org for additional information.

4. PROGRAMME-AT-A-GLANCE
The IAS 2011 Programme-at-a-Glance (PAG), a full schedule of conference sessions, will be launched on the IAS 2011 website in June.
In order to enjoy the full interactive experience, you will need to download the free Microsoft Silverlight plug-in from the following address: http://www.microsoft.com/getsilverlight/.

5. IAS 2011 SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
The IAS 2011 Commercial Invitation includes the list of sponsorship opportunities for the conference. Please click here to download a copy.
For additional information, please contact the secretariat at sponsorship@ias2011.org.

6. FOLLOW IAS 2011 ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER
Become a fan of IAS 2011 on Facebook and stay in touch with the latest conference updates and developments. Please visit www.facebook.com/ias2011 to become a fan.
We will also be tweeting – @ias2011 – and hope many of you will tweet along with us, using #IAS2011 to keep the conversation going.

7. KEY DATES
We remind you of the following important deadlines:
1 April 2011
- Volunteer applications open
15 April 2011
- Satellite applications close
20 April 2011
- Late breaker abstract submissions open
5 May 2011
- Registration late fee deadline
23 May 2011
- Late breaker abstract submissions close
25 May 2011
- Exhibition space applications close
17-20 July 2011

- Conference

Sincerely,

IAS 2011 Conference Secretariat
6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
Rome, Italy, 17 - 20 July 2011

www.ias2011.org | www.iasociety.org




ONLINE COVERAGE OF XVIII INTERNATIONAL AIDS CONFERENCE TO INCLUDE DAILY WEBCASTS, LIVE COVERAGE, PODCASTS AND NEWS RECAPS

INTERNATIONAL AIDS SOCIETY AND KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION PARTNER TO OFFER DAILY, COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE OF CONFERENCE FOR FREE

Menlo Park, CA and Geneva, Switzerland -- The International AIDS Society (IAS) and the Kaiser Family Foundation will provide worldwide online access to the XVIII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) taking place in Vienna, Austria, July 18-23, 2010. Kaiser -- an independent operating foundation and non-partisan source of facts, information, and analysis, based in Menlo Park, Calif., USA -- is the official webcaster for AIDS 2010, providing daily coverage of conference developments on its website, http://www.kff.org/aids2010.

In addition to more than 50 online webcasts of conference sessions, podcasts will be available for downloading in both English and Russian. Some sessions, including the Opening and Closing Sessions, will be presented via live webcast, while other coverage will be tape-delayed by a few hours and available on-demand. The webcasts will include sessions featuring former U.S. President Bill Clinton, South African Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe, South African Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi, philanthropist Bill Gates and Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

A daily video recap of conference developments with Science magazine's Jon Cohen will also be available. An outline of scheduled coverage is available at http://www.kff.org/aids2010.

Kaiser's Daily Global Health Policy Report, a free, daily news summary service will be enhanced during the week of the conference to include summaries of what the global media are reporting from the conference and original recaps of information that may not be covered elsewhere.

Kaiser is also providing session coverage for the official and independent conference hubs, which will feature a viewing of select sessions followed by discussions and workshops on how the sessions' content can be applied locally. The three official conference hubs will be held in Moscow, Russia, Kiev, Ukraine, and Almaty, Kazakhstan, while more than 30 independent hubs in over 20 countries are already planned.

A widget for sharing Kaiser's content is available for organizations and individuals who want to further spread the information by carrying the coverage on their own websites, blogs or social networking pages.

"The partnership with Kaiser Family Foundation is central to our ability to extend the reach of the International AIDS Conference well beyond the conference venue and dates," said IAS Acting Executive Director, Mats Ahnlund. "In conjunction with our other online resources, the webcasts ensure that those unable to attend the conference have access to its key resources, while providing a lasting record of conference proceedings. Kaiser's substantive and technical expertise, along with their well-earned reputation for high-quality coverage, makes them the ideal webcasting partner."


"This eight-year running partnership allows us to play a vital role in ensuring people around the world can learn about the important developments in HIV/AIDS that come out of this conference," said Drew Altman, Ph.D., Kaiser President and CEO. "By providing free, online access, we are helping to connect the information and advances generated at the conference to communities in the developed and developing world, ultimately raising awareness of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the efforts to address it."

AIDS 2010 will provide presentations of important new scientific research and opportunities for dialogue on the major challenges facing the global response to AIDS. The 2010 conference theme, Rights Here, Right Now, emphasizes human rights as a prerequisite to a successful response to HIV, including equal access to health care and life-saving prevention and treatment programs. There are more than 33 million people living with HIV worldwide.

More information about the XVIII International AIDS Conference, including the latest program details, is available at http://www.aids2010.org.

Kaiser's AIDS 2010 conference coverage will be available through the Foundation's Global Health Gateway, http://globalhealth.kff.org, which also features original policy analysis and polling on the U.S. role in global health; country-specific data through the Global Health Facts database; regularly updated resources tracking major policy and budget developments; news summaries from the Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report; and a reporter's guide to covering global health.


About the Kaiser Family Foundation The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation is a U.S.-based, non-profit, private operating foundation focusing on the major health care issues facing the U.S. and on global health policy. The Foundation has a longstanding interest in HIV in the U.S. and around the world.


About the IAS The International AIDS Society (IAS) is the world's leading independent association of HIV professionals, with 14,000 members from 190 countries working at all levels of the global response to AIDS. Our members include researchers from all disciplines, clinicians, public health and community practitioners on the frontlines of the epidemic, as well as policy and program planners. The IAS is the custodian of the biennial International AIDS Conference.

For more information, please visit
http://globalhealth.kff.org/AIDS2010
http://www.aids2010.org




8 March 2010
Expert Panel Releases Comprehensive New Research Agenda to Improve HIV Responses for Women and Children

On International Women’s Day, IAS-Convened Panel Seeks Significant New Focus on Women and Children, Who Make up the Majority of People Living with HIV Worldwide

8 March (Geneva, Switzerland) -- As the HIV pandemic continues to exact an increasing toll on women and children, the International AIDS Society (IAS) and 15 other leading public and private sector organizations have released a comprehensive new research agenda designed to significantly advance global responses to HIV in women and children. The new consensus statement, Asking the Right Questions: Advancing an HIV Research Agenda for Women and Children, includes 20 specific recommendations to expand and improve responses to the HIV-related challenges facing women and children worldwide. The Agenda, which focuses on key gaps in clinical and programmatic knowledge that hinder access to effective HIV prevention, treatment and care for women and children, is being released today to coincide with International Women’s Day, whose theme is “Equal Rights, Equal Opportunities: Progress for All.” Inadequate responses to HIV are a major barrier to women’s health and progress worldwide. According to UNAIDS, 15.7 million women and 2.1 million children under age 15 were living with HIV in 2008. Women and children made up the majority of the estimated 33.4 million people living with HIV in 2008.
For more information, please visit www.iasociety.org.




November 25, 2008
2009 HIV/AIDS IMPLEMENTERS' MEETING ANNOUNCES CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
Meeting Information and Abstract Submission Guidelines Available Online at: www.hivimplementers.com

Washington, DC The U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), along with the Government of Namibia; the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; UNAIDS; UNICEF; the World Bank; the World Health Organization; and the Global Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS, is pleased to announce a call for abstracts for the 2009 HIV/AIDS Implementers Meeting.

The HIV/AIDS Implementers Meeting will take place June 10-14, 2009 in Windhoek, Namibia. This year's theme is Optimizing the Response: Partnerships for Sustainability. The meeting gathers together program implementers to share best practices and lessons learned in the fight against global HIV/AIDS. This year's meeting will focus on widely disseminating best practices and lessons learned during the implementation of multi-sectoral HIV/AIDS programs with a emphasis on optimizing the impact of prevention, care and treatment programs; enhancing program quality; promoting coordination among partners; and encouraging innovative responses. Through presentations, dialogue and networking, participants will share information that will directly impact the future of HIV/AIDS program implementation.

The Conference Steering Committee invites abstract submissions that will provide information for action best practices and lessons learned that have been identified through real-world implementation and operational research as supporting the scale-up of HIV prevention, treatment, and care to reach unprecedented levels of scope, quality, and access.

The final deadline for submissions is February 12, 2009. The organizing committee will accept abstracts beginning in mid-December 2008. More information regarding required abstract format and guidelines for submission can be found online at: www.hivimplementers.com.

What are the abstract tracks for this year's meeting?
The 2009 program will focus on how implementers are meeting challenges that affect the scale-up of HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care. Six tracks have been identified for the 2009 HIV/AIDS Implementers Meeting that cut across all subject matter areas of HIV/AIDS programming:

- Responding to Challenges in HIV Prevention
- Women and Children
- Effective HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support Programs for MSM, Drug-Users, People in Prisons, and People in Sex Work
- Evolving Challenges in Treatment, Laboratory, Care and Support Services
- Performance-Based Programming & Systems-Strengthening
- Cross-cutting

Who is eligible to submit an abstract?
Persons and organizations actively engaged as implementers in HIV/AIDS and related program implementation and evaluation are eligible to submit abstracts for consideration.

Who reviews the submitted abstracts?
Abstracts will be peer-reviewed by a panel of international experts. At least two reviewers will read and score each of the submitted abstracts. The set of scored abstracts will then be submitted for consideration by the program planning group to determine which of the abstracts are best suited for inclusion on the agenda for oral presentation or as a poster presentation display. After a thorough review process, abstracts that best inform on how to implement programs and respond to the session tracks will be selected.

How can I register for the 2009 HIV/AIDS Implementers Meeting?
Please visit the registration page of the meeting website at www.hivimplementers.com/registration.asp for more details.

When will notifications be made and what does it mean to be accepted?
Notification of acceptance will be on or before March 7, 2009. Presenters of accepted abstracts will be able to register for the meeting during a defined registration period (one registration slot per accepted abstract is guaranteed). Unfortunately the Implementers Meeting is not able to cover travel costs and does not have a scholarship program. We encourage persons with an accepted abstract to contact their supporting agency if resources are needed.

If your abstract is not selected and you are still interested in attending the meeting, there are a limited number of Open Enrollment delegate slots available for implementers. The application and selection process are described in more detail at www.hivimplementers.org/registration.asp .


Media Contacts: Kristin Pugh/Jennifer Peterson (PEPFAR) +1-202-663-2708
Information about the sponsors of the meeting: The U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) was launched in 2003 by
President George W. Bush to combat global HIV/AIDS, and is the largest commitment by any nation to combat a single disease in history. Through PEPFAR, the U.S. Government has already provided $18.8 billion in HIV/AIDS funding, with a reauthorization of up to $48 billion for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria over the next five years.


The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a unique global public/private partnership dedicated to attracting and disbursing additional resources to prevent and treat HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. This partnership between governments, civil society, the private sector and affected communities represents a new approach to international health financing. The Global Fund works in close collaboration with other bilateral and multilateral organizations to supplement existing efforts dealing with the three diseases. For more information about the Global Fund, please visit www.theglobalfund.org.


UNAIDS is an innovative joint venture of the United Nations, bringing together the efforts and resources of the UNAIDS Secretariat and ten UN system organizations in the AIDS response. The Secretariat headquarters is in Geneva, Switzerland with staff on the ground in more than 80 countries. Coherent action on AIDS by the UN system is coordinated in countries through UN theme groups, and joint programmes on AIDS. UNAIDS Cosponsors include UNHCR, UNICEF, WFP, UNDP, UNFPA, UNODC, ILO, UNESCO, WHO and the World Bank. Visit the UNAIDS Web site at www.unaids.org


UNICEF is on the ground in over 150 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence. The world's largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments. For more information, please visit www.unicef.org.


The World Bank is committed to providing long-term, sustained support for comprehensive national responses to HIV and AIDS, including effective prevention of new infections, care and treatment for infected people, and mitigation of the devastating social and economic consequences for affected families and communities. The World Bank provides comprehensive and sustainable financing for AIDS programs worldwide and to date has committed more than US $3.8 billion since 1988. For more information on the World Bank's response to HIV/AIDS, please visit www.worldbank.org/aids.


The World Health Organization (WHO) is the directing and coordinating authority on international health work and takes the lead in the United Nations system in the global health sector response to the AIDS epidemic. For more information, please visit www.who.int.


The Global Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (GNP+) is a global network for and by people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV). Its overall aim is to improve the quality of life of PLHIV. The work of GNP+ is guided by the Global Advocacy Agenda, which consists of three key areas: (i) Promoting universal access to HIV/AIDS care, treatment and prevention; (ii) Combating stigma and discrimination; and (iii) Promoting the greater and more meaningful involvement of PLHIV. GNP+ is the only international network representing the diverse voices of all PLHIV. As a network based on emancipation and self-determination, GNP+ nurtured the development of six fully independent regional networks of PLHIV covering Africa (NAP+), Asia (APN+), the Caribbean (CRN+), Europe (GNP+ Europe), Latin America (REDLa+) and North America (GNP+ NA). Elected representatives from these networks form the GNP+ Board. For more information, please visit www.gnpplus.net.

For more information, please visit www.hivimplementers.com.


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